Black Lives Matter

This has been a very upsetting couple of weeks, but if you’re paying attention you already know that.  Because of the continuing pandemic, I choose to be mostly homebound, writing, reading, zooming, watching fun stuff on TV like Star Trek and Christopher Guest mockumentaries.  But this week I could barely tear myself away from CNN, … Continue reading Black Lives Matter

Continued Sheltering, part three

Greetings!  If you’re a regular reader, you know the past two weeks I’ve suggested some prayers that I’ve found helpful, and I continue to encourage everyone to write prayers and affirmations too.  It’s funny, because almost as soon as the first post went up, I began to feel kind of down.  And so I felt … Continue reading Continued Sheltering, part three

The Dutch House, a review

The Amazon tagline describes this novel by Ann Patchett as the story of a family that goes from poverty to riches to poverty and back to riches again.  Well, yeah, but that hardly prepares us for the plot of this book.  More than a few reviewers call it a fairy tale.  I just didn’t see … Continue reading The Dutch House, a review

Sheltering-in-Place

When I was 21 I went to Europe on a five-week student tour with my best friends.  On our last day we were in England, and we went on a boat ride down the Thames to Greenwich.  I have several memories of that day, a few funny stories, conversations, photos, but there was one image … Continue reading Sheltering-in-Place

Little Fires Everywhere, a consideration of race and class in America

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng is a well-written, topical book, an engrossing read, and the basis for a brand-new series starring Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon on Hulu.  I want to tell you what I think about it, but let’s face it, I’m sure you can go online or pick up a TV guide … Continue reading Little Fires Everywhere, a consideration of race and class in America

The World That We Knew, a review

Alice Hoffman’s “The World That We Knew” is an achingly beautiful fairy tale about the Holocaust.  Her novel emphasizes the plight of children separated from their parents:  Jewish children and the offspring of Resistance Fighters hiding with false ID’s in convent schools; others roaming by themselves or in small groups in the forest, foraging for … Continue reading The World That We Knew, a review

Little Women, a consideration

I can’t remember the number of times I’ve read Little Women.  I’m pretty sure I read it at least twice when I was a kid, but perhaps it was three times or more.  I read it again in my late 20s/early 30s when the book group I’d formed with friends decided to read it—or I … Continue reading Little Women, a consideration

Book Review: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Hey, it's getting cold and rainy here:  perfect time to take refuge in books!  Enjoy! My edition of Their Eyes Were Watching God had plenty of literary and historical notes both fore and aft, but I’ll admit I got impatient and just started in on the novel itself.  I will tell you that the editors … Continue reading Book Review: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Book News!

Here in California it remains unseasonably warm, so it's hard to believe that the holidays are right abound the corner. I want to let you know that all the paperback novels in my Avian Series are currently on sale at Amazon for 15% off.  They all have beautiful new covers designed by graphic artist Karen … Continue reading Book News!

Free Books

Years ago, I whimsically folded a few of my original poems into paper airplanes and flew them into the audience at a reading.  People were amused. This happened long ago, in the "Before Times," when no one had heard the names Microsoft or Apple iPhone.  It was a simpler era, and yet today I say … Continue reading Free Books