How to Find the Muse

Hey, it's National Poetry Month, so I've decided to post a few poems this April.  It's been fun for me to look back over my decades-long collection of poems to find a few that will be just right for this moment in time.  None of those wild, whiny, passionate unrequited love poems I seemed prone … Continue reading How to Find the Muse

Sheltering-in-Place

When I was 21 I went to Europe on a five-week student tour with my best friends.  On our last day we were in England, and we went on a boat ride down the Thames to Greenwich.  I have several memories of that day, a few funny stories, conversations, photos, but there was one image … Continue reading Sheltering-in-Place

Little Fires Everywhere, a consideration of race and class in America

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng is a well-written, topical book, an engrossing read, and the basis for a brand-new series starring Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon on Hulu.  I want to tell you what I think about it, but let’s face it, I’m sure you can go online or pick up a TV guide … Continue reading Little Fires Everywhere, a consideration of race and class in America

Oisin and Patrick: an Irish Tale

For Saint Patrick’s Day, I thought I would share a bit of Irish history (sometimes called mythology).  This poem tells the story of Patrick’s encounter with a poet named Oisin.  Oisin (pronounced O-sheen) was the son of Finn MacUail (pronounced M’Cool) who was a great warrior.  Oisin was the poet who recorded his father’s great … Continue reading Oisin and Patrick: an Irish Tale

Poetic License

When I feel sad disconnected unsure of where I belong I invite the poet in.   She will remember the soft yellow-gray belly of the mocking bird vibrating as he trills high above me on the outer branch of a tree at the edge of the bridge. Darn, I can’t remember what kind of tree … Continue reading Poetic License

The World That We Knew, a review

Alice Hoffman’s “The World That We Knew” is an achingly beautiful fairy tale about the Holocaust.  Her novel emphasizes the plight of children separated from their parents:  Jewish children and the offspring of Resistance Fighters hiding with false ID’s in convent schools; others roaming by themselves or in small groups in the forest, foraging for … Continue reading The World That We Knew, a review

Cat Naps and Rock Candy

Written with the prompts:  take a cat nap, some of the rocks, anger, majestic benevolence, grand rising, I got the real story a few days later I like to take a cat nap mid-afternoon and I won’t apologize for that.  When I took up with Harold, he used to tease me about it, told me … Continue reading Cat Naps and Rock Candy

The Breath of the Universe

Hey, it's Valentine's Day, so I decided to dig up one of my sweetest little love stories of all time.  It's all about the breath.  And chocolate.  Written with my Thursday group with these prompts:  Mr. I Can’t, Oh shit, Rufus said, hallways, chocolate yes indeed Matilda called Rufus Mr. I Can’t, Mr. Rain On … Continue reading The Breath of the Universe

Marilyn’s Folly

Written with the prompts:  Angus lost a shoe not far from the folly, busy street but you are alone, dog named Moose who didn’t like men, buyer’s remorse, refuse, I can carry on   It all started the night Marilyn’s husband Angus lost his shoe somewhere in the backyard, near the gazebo that Marilyn called … Continue reading Marilyn’s Folly

Little Women, a consideration

I can’t remember the number of times I’ve read Little Women.  I’m pretty sure I read it at least twice when I was a kid, but perhaps it was three times or more.  I read it again in my late 20s/early 30s when the book group I’d formed with friends decided to read it—or I … Continue reading Little Women, a consideration